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Congratulations to @natasha_wheatl for winning the Surrency Prize for best LHR article in 2017-18, for “Spectral Legal Personality in Interwar International Law”! https://t.co/3T7W1Bf9F6

We agree. We’ve recently started a policy of screening peer reviews for unnecessarily unpleasant criticism. If something strikes as over the top, we ask the reviewer to modify. If they do not, we reserve the right to redact or alter.

Featuring articles, roundtables and more from a symposium at Stanford Law School in January, 2018. Contributors include Lawrence M. Friedman, Sarah Barringer Gordon, Laura Kalman, Hendrik Hartog, David Sugarman, @arielagross @JohnFabianWitt @jedshug and many more!

We are pleased to announce the publication of a special issue celebrating the scholarship of Professor Robert W. Gordon of @StanfordLaw and formerly of @YaleLawSch
https://t.co/dgTLS3Qrws

In response to numerous inquiries, we are pleased to announce that @TBrownNagin's history of #TheResistance is now open access for the next month! https://t.co/OcQnsfkZXk @legalhistory @zeldenprof @gauthamrao @TheDocketLHR

New issue of #Law and #History Review now available https://t.co/x80PyCkmnG #twitterstorians @history_law

New issue of #Law and #History Review now available https://t.co/I9oxZKqjYN #twitterstorians @history_law

“Lawless Wars of Empire? The International Law of War in the Philippines, 1898–1903”
— Will Smiley’s new article just out in Law and History Review @history_law https://t.co/cUrkbTm4XJ

Brilliant from Will Smiley on history of law of war: U.S. reinterprets laws of armed conflict to assert cultural superiority while still authorizing fierce and summary violence. Empire advances "not only by avoiding the law, but by interpreting it." https://t.co/NivKp80G48

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