The Docket

A Bold and Timely Venture: The Docket at LHR

The Law and History Review (LHR) is already among the most highly regarded historical and legal journals published in English.  It is widely read by historians, lawyers, and social scientists, many trained in multiple disciplines.  As the official journal of the American Society for Legal History (ASLH), LHR is an invaluable resource, allowing us to...

Adriana Chira Talks to The Docket About Transatlantic Research and the History of Slavery in Cuba

Is this article part of a book project?  If so, could you give our readers a sense of what you will be trying to accomplish in the book? Yes, the article is part of my first book project, tentatively titled Becoming Free of Color: Popular Racial Thought in Cuba, 1791-1868. It is a book about...

Studying the poor in a neoliberal age. An interview with Brooke Depenbusch.

Brooke, thanks so much for spending some time with The Docket.  First, we know that you are working on a dissertation at the University of Minnesota.  Can you give our readers an overview of the project? Of course – it’s a pleasure!  My dissertation explores the history of general relief between the New Deal and the...

Resisting the Colonial Canadian State. A Journey into the Archives with Catherine Evans.

Library and Archives Canada, formerly the Canadian National Archives, houses boxes of capital case files dating from 1867, the year of Confederation, to 1976, when Canada abandoned the death penalty. There are hundreds of files. When a defendant was convicted of murder or another capital crime, documents related to the case were forwarded to the...

New Takes on Jim Crow

A string of recent works on racial segregation in the American South raises new questions about the legal system commonly referred to as Jim Crow. Collectively the works explore how legal institutions shaped racist practice and ideology as well as resistance to them, slippages between intimate patterns of caste domination and more bureaucratic forms of...